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FEMA Flood Zone Classifications

 

Special Flood Hazard Areas – High Risk
Special Flood Hazard Areas represent the area subject to inundation by 1-percent-annual chance flood. Structures located within the SFHA have a 26-percent chance of flooding during the life of a standard 30-year mortgage. Federal floodplain management regulations and mandatory flood insurance purchase requirements apply in these FEMA flood zones.
ZONE DESCRIPTION
A Areas subject to inundation by the 1-percent-annual-chance flood event. Because detailed hydraulic analyses have not been performed, no Base Flood Elevations (BFEs) or flood depths are shown.
AE, A1-A30 Areas subject to inundation by the 1-percent-annual-chance flood event determined by detailed methods. BFEs are shown within these zones. (Zone AE is used on new and revised maps in place of Zones A1–A30.)
AH Areas subject to inundation by 1-percent-annual-chance shallow flooding (usually areas of ponding) where average depths are 1–3 feet. BFEs derived from detailed hydraulic analyses are shown in this zone.
AO Areas subject to inundation by 1-percent-annual-chance shallow flooding (usually sheet flow on sloping terrain) where average depths are 1–3 feet. Average flood depths derived from detailed hydraulic analyses are shown within this zone.
AR Areas that result from the decertification of a previously accredited flood protection system that is determined to be in the process of being restored to provide base flood protection.
A99 Areas subject to inundation by the 1-percent-annual-chance flood event, but which will ultimately be protected upon completion of an under-construction Federal flood protection system. These are areas of special flood hazard where enough progress has been made on the construction of a protection system, such as dikes, dams, and levees, to consider it complete for insurance rating purposes. Zone A99 may be used only when the flood protection system has reached specified statutory progress toward completion. No BFEs or flood depths are shown.
Coastal High Hazard Areas – High Risk
Coastal High Hazard Areas (CHHA) represent the area subject to inundation by 1-percent-annual chance flood, extending from offshore to the inland limit of a primary front al dune along an open coast and any other area subject to high velocity wave action from storms or seismic sources. Structures located within the CHHA have a 26-percent chance of flooding during the life of a standard 30-year mortgage. Federal floodplain management regulations and mandatory purchase requirements apply in these FEMA flood zones.
ZONE DESCRIPTION
V Areas along coasts subject to inundation by the 1-percent-annual-chance flood event with additional hazards associated with storm-induced waves. Because detailed coastal analyses have not been performed, no BFEs or flood depths are shown.
VE, V1-V30 Areas along coasts subject to inundation by the 1-percent-annual-chance flood event with additional hazards due to storm-induced velocity wave action. BFEs derived from detailed hydraulic coastal analyses are shown within these zones. (Zone VE is used on new and revised maps in place of Zones V1–V30.)
Moderate and Minimal Risk Areas
Areas of moderate or minimal hazard are studied based upon the principal source of flood in the area. However, buildings in these zones could be flooded by severe, concentrated rainfall coupled with inadequate local drainage systems. Local stormwater drainage systems are not normally considered in a community’s flood insurance study. The failure of a local drainage system can create areas of high flood risk within these zones. Flood insurance is available in participating communities, but is not required by regulation in these zones. Nearly 25-percent of all flood claims filed are for structures located within these FEMA flood zones.
ZONE DESCRIPTION
B, X (shaded) Moderate risk areas within the 0.2-percent-annual-chance floodplain, areas of 1-percent-annual-chance flooding where average depths are less than 1 foot, areas of 1-percent-annual-chance flooding where the contributing drainage area is less than 1 square mile, and areas protected from the 1-percent-annual-chance flood by a levee. No BFEs or base flood depths are shown within these zones. (Zone X (shaded) is used on new and revised maps in place of Zone B.)
C, X (unshaded) Minimal risk areas outside the 1-percent and .2-percent-annual-chance floodplains. No BFEs or base flood depths are shown within these zones. (Zone X (unshaded) is used on new and revised maps in place of Zone C.)
Undetermined Risk Areas
ZONE DESCRIPTION
D Unstudied areas where flood hazards are undetermined, but flooding is possible. No mandatory flood insurance purchase requirements apply, but coverage is available in participating communities.

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Flood Zone Report Visual Evidence

Are you in a Flood Zone? See a home on the newest FEMA Flood Map. It’s easy to order your own detailed Report.

If this comprehensive Flood Zone Report reveals the structures outside the FEMA high-risk flood zone, the homeowner can use the information to dispute the mandatory flood insurance requirement. Simply forward the information to the lender or insurance company.

  • Experienced FEMA Map Analysts & Certified Floodplain Managers available.
  • Background in the NFIP and lender compliance.
  • Flood Vendor services available to the public outside of contacts.
  • Executive Member of the National Flood Determination Association (NFDA).
  • New and Preliminary FEMA Flood Map Research.
  • Continued service and support.
  • Order Now

 

Flood Zone Review

 

 

 

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Elevation Certificate Free Review

An Elevation Certificate details a structure’s elevation. This certificate verifies the elevation of the lowest floor of a house relative to the ground. It’s especially important if your house/building is in a FEMA high-risk flood zone.

If you find that the Lowest Adjacent Grade (LAG) of the structure is above the FEMA Base Flood Elevation (BFE), a Letter of Map Amendment (LOMA) of removal is possible. This will drop the mandatory flood insurance requirement, and if the homeowner choose to have flood insurance, it’s available at a heavily reduced price.

 

How to get an Elevation Certificate

If you are looking for an elevation certificate, check with your local government for any elevation information or certificate on file. You may have one in your closing documents. If not, check with the local building department to see if there is one in your permit file or contact the builder that sold the property. If nothing is available, you must contract a state-licensed surveyor to complete the Elevation Certificate. The price of an elevation certificate varies greatly by state. We recommend calling around to find an average price in the area…hopefully, the homeowner can find a good deal.

Need to get an Elevation Certificate? Click here

 

What should I do if I have an Elevation Certificate?

You can email us a copy for a Free Elevation Certificate Review. We will study the elevations and discuss your options. Save time and money by working with an experienced FEMA Map Specialist.

Simply email it to support@secondlookflood.com

 

Does an Elevation Certificate expire?

No- even an older elevation certificate has valuable information. While the FEMA Base Flood Elevation (BFE), showing the high-risk flood zone, may change over time, the Lowest Adjacent Grade (LAG) of the house/structure does not change.  We can still compare the LAG to the current FEMA BFE.

 


 

FEMA Elevation Certificate

 

 

 

 

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